Historic Homes

Architectural Homes from the 1800s & 1900s


Stealey-Goff Vance House
Built in approximately 1807 by Jacob Stealey, a tanner, it stands at 123 W. Main Street. It is possibly the oldest existing house in Clarksburg. Nathan Goff acquired the house by a deed of trust in 1881 and Mary R. Goff owned it from 1885-1908 during which time it was remodeled and Victorian gingerbread added. It remained in Mrs. Goff’s estate until 1935 when Amy Roberts Vance purchased it. It was her residence for 34 years. Of note, it was the home of Cyrus R. Vance who was the Secretary of the Army from 1962 to 1964 and the U.S. Secretary of State from 1976 to 1979. This home was entered into the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. (Downtown Historic District)


Stealey-Goff Vance House


Virgil Highland House
Dubbed “The Castle”, this Victorian Romanesque structure was built at 240 E. Main Street in 1903-1905. It is one of the most architecturally striking buildings in the Quality Hill district. This building was constructed by Virgil Highland, who was an organizer and president of the Empire National Bank and president of the company that published both of the city’s two newspapers. The structure was designed by the architectural firm of Holmboe and Rafferty, a company that was located in Clarksburg and who were also responsible for the design of many public buildings and courthouses throughout central West Virginia. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Virgil Highland House


Keeley House
Believed to have been built in approximately 1871 by George Bastable, it can be found at 217 E. Main Street. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Keeley House


Abraham Smith Jr. House
Built in approximately 1871 by Smith, an old N.J. Quaker family, on land acquired from William Freeman, who purchased the land from George Bastable. This house is located at 239 E. Main Street. This home was later owned by Louis A. Johnson, Secretary of Defense under President Harry Truman. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Abraham Smith Jr. House


Nathan J. Coplin House
Located at 227 E. Main Street, this 2 ½ story Italiante house was built by Colonel Nathan J. Coplin in approximately 1873 on land acquired from John and Martha Bassel. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Nathan J. Coplin House


Burton Despard House
Found at 329 E. Main Street, this house was built in 1856 by Colonel Burton Despard who occupied it until 1874. It was later the residence of Duncan Despard, S.R. Harrison, Sr. and Dr. J. M. Bowcock. The R. D. Wilson Family occupied the house from 1919 to 1926, Jennie Wilson from 1926 to 1939, and it is now the Davis- Weaver Funeral Home. Only two families and one business have owned this grand home for over 130 years. The oldest existing home in the Quality Hill Historic District. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Burton Despard House


James Clifford House
Located at 270 E. Main Street, James Clifford built this house in 1880 of brick kilned on the property. It was passed on to his daughter, Anna Clifford and then to her son, Dr. James T. Brennan and her daughter Bernadette. It remained in the family until it was sold to the American Legion around 1970. It was built on land acquired from the Jackson family and used as a corral for Union horses during the Civil War. (Quality Hill Historic District)


James Clifford House


Freeman-Stout House
Located at 151 E. Main Street in the Quality Hill area, this Victoria Gothic home was built circa 1872 by William H. Freeman, a brother-in-law to Burton Despard. This home is now known as the Main Street Manor and is just a short walk from the downtown area. (Quality Hill Historic District)


Freeman-Stout House


Thomas W. Harrison House
Built around 1860 by T.W. Harrison, it is situated at 317 Buckhannon Avenue. T.W. Harrison occupied the home until 1906 and it was later occupied by S.R. Harrison, J. Edgar Long and since 1940, the family of Col. Louis A. Johnson, U.S. Secretary of Defense from 1949-1950. (Goff Plaza area)


Thomas W. Harrison House


William Brent Maxwell House
Located at 529 W. Pike Street, this Neo-Classical mansion was built in 1912. (Downtown Historic District)


William Brent Maxwell House


Paul Robinson-Jackson House
On the northwest end of Quality Hill was built in 1910 and is a classic revival representing some of the finer elements of the beaux-arts design, is the only example of this style in the district. Built by Paul Robinson, VP of Union National Bank, on the site of John George Jackson's 1801 mansion, which by 1890, had deteriorated into a sad state of repair. Jackson built the mansion for his first wife, Mary Payne, sister of Molly Madison. The new owners returned the house to its original color of white. It had been painted a pale yellow for many years.


Paul Robinson-Jackson House


Get in Touch

Greater Clarksburg Convention & Visitors Bureau
215 South Third Street, Ste. 101
Clarksburg WV. 26301
(304) 622-2157
1-877-622-2157

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